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Can I Record School Board Meetings in New York State?

yep, it's legal.

This question pops up often.

Can an interested party record a school board or school committee meeting in New York State? [NJ and PA are touched upon as well.]

The short answer: Absolutely, provided that the recording process and its devices don’t disrupt the proceedings.

Remember, a public meeting constitutes quorum gathering to discuss issues. This means that you’re free to record regular school board meetings, budget hearings, committee meetings, etc. – any time there’s quorum/over half the official body in attendance with the intent to conduct public business, go ahead.

But school boards aren’t always into public records and accountability. When your New York State school district denies that you’re allowed to tape a meeting, cite the following precedents:

Then there’s Csorny, et al. v. Shoreham-Wading River Central School District, et al. (Index No. 31583/00) which not only upholds the above rulings, but cites supporting precedent in both Pennsylvania and New Jersey:

The overwhelming weight of authority from other states likewise supports our holding herein. In Hain v Board of Directors of Reading School Dist. (163 Pa Commw 479, 641 A2d 661), the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania struck a school board rule prohibiting the videotape recording of public meetings as violative of Pennsylvania’s Sunshine Act. In Maurice River Tp. Bd. of Educ. v Maurice River Tp. Teachers Assn. (193 NJ Super 488, 475 A2d 59, affg 455 A2d 563), the New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division, similarly held that a school board could not enact a blanket prohibition against videotaping of public meetings, as such a rule violated New Jersey’s Open Public Meetings Act (NJSA 10:4-6 et seq; see also Sudol v Borough of North Arlington, 137 NJ Super 149, 348 A2d 216 [NJ Super]).

There ya go, kids. Record at will.

And when the Board members freak out, hand them a sheet of paper citing these precedents and make it very clear that their ignorance of the law in no way supersedes either statute or precedent.

[cross-posted at KitchenTableMath]

23 Responses to “Can I Record School Board Meetings in New York State?”

  1. Gary says:

    Matthew,

    That is so true about Board Members potentially freaking out. Same goes for Principals, Superintendents, and so many more on a wide range of subjects.

    Better question is can you take a snapshot of the Board Members reaction? :D

    Gary aka The MatureKid

  2. Matthew says:

    Recording meetings can obviously come across as threatening to a Board – if I were to advise someone who said they were going to record, I’d suggest that they tell the Board well in advance and make it clear that they’d provide a copy of their tape to the District. It should be made clear that recording is being done for the sake of public record and the public good. And really, why not, especially when it’s so easy to copy CDs/DVDs now?

    That can help eliminate some of those photo-worthy reactions. ;)

  3. National FORUM of Applied Educational Research Journal
    21 (3) 2008

    An Exploratory Phenomenological Study of African American Male Pre-Service Teachers at a Historical Black University in the Mid-South

    Lucian Yates, III, Dean
    Barry A. Pelphrey, Associate Dean
    Patricia A. Smith, Assistant Professor
    The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
    Prairie View A&M University
    Member of the Texas A&M University System
    Prairie View, Texas
    ________________________________________________________________________
    ABSTRACT
    This exploratory phenomenological study was conducted to ascertain which factors caused African American male pre-service teachers to persist at a HBCU in the Mid-South. The work is grounded in the conceptual framework called resiliency. Resiliency asks the question, “How do children, adolescents, and young people “make it” when they are exposed to or face major stress and adversity? The results of this study point to what are commonly called “protective factors” that exist in the lives of these young men. They are: (1) families/communities, (2) the individual, and (3) the school. To see entire article, go to: http://www.nationalforum.com
    ________________________________________________________________________

    Concluding Remarks

    This study underscored the notion that despite the abject conditions that many African American males face in the country and despite the current conditions and dearth of African American male teachers in America’s schools, colleges or schools of education can create programs and conditions that will improve the number of African American males in the teaching profession. This article showcases the work done by a program called Protégés and Provocateurs at a small HBCU in the mid-south. Replication of this model and further research is suggested to triangulate and institutionalize these results.

    Formatted by Dr. Mary Alice Kritsonis, National Research and Manuscript Preparation Editor, National FORUM Journals, Houston, Texas. http://www.nationalforum.com

  4. Dr. William Allan Kritsonis Inducted into the William H. Parker Leadership Academy Hall of Honor (HBCU)

    Remarks by Angela Stevens McNeil
    July 26th 2008

    Good Morning. My name is Angela Stevens McNeil and I have the privilege of introducing the next Hall of Honor Inductee, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis. Dr. Kritsonis was chosen because of his dedication to the educational advancement of Prairie View A&M University students. He earned a Bachelor’s degree in 1969 from Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington. In 1971, he earned his Master’s in Education from Seattle Pacific University. In 1976, he earned his PhD from the University of Iowa.
    Dr. Kritsonis has served and blessed the field of education as a teacher, principal, superintendent of schools, director of student teaching and field experiences, invited guest professor, author, consultant, editor-in-chief, and publisher. He has also earned tenure as a professor at the highest academic rank at two major universities.
    In 2005, Dr. Kritsonis was an Invited Visiting Lecturer at the Oxford Round Table at Oriel College in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. His lecture was entitled the Ways of Knowing through the Realms of Meaning.
    In 2004, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies.
    Dr. William Kritsonis is a well respected author of more than 500 articles in professional journals and several books. In 1983, Dr. Kritsonis founded the NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS. These publications represent a group of highly respected scholarly academic periodicals. In 2004, he established the DOCTORAL FORUM – National Journal for Publishing and Mentoring Doctoral Student Research. The DOCTORAL FORUM is the only refereed journal in America committed to publishing doctoral students while they are enrolled in course work in their doctoral programs. Over 300 articles have been published by doctorate and master’s degree students and most are indexed in ERIC.
    Currently, Dr. Kritsonis is a Professor in the PhD Program in Educational Leadership here at Prairie View A&M University.
    Dr. William Kritsonis has dedicated himself to the advancement of educational leadership and to the education of students at all levels. It is my honor to bring him to the stage at this time as a William H. Parker Leadership Academy Hall of Honor Inductee.

  5. Smaller Learning Communities: Pre-Implementation Planning Critical to Success

    Alex Torrez
    PhD Student in Educational Leadership
    The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
    Prairie View A&M University
    Prairie View, Texas
    Assistant Superintendent
    Clear Creek Independent School District
    Houston, Texas

    William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
    Professor and Faculty Mentor
    PhD Program in Educational Leadership
    The Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
    Prairie View A&M University
    Member of the Texas A&M University System
    Visiting Lecturer (2005)
    Oxford Round Table
    University of Oxford, Oxford, England
    Distinguished Alumnus (2004)
    College of Education and Professional Studies
    Central Washington University

    ________________________________________________________________________
    ABSTRACT

    This article clearly defines the three crucial pre-implementation principles to maximize the success of Smaller Learning Communities in large high schools. Establishing clear understanding for the need of the SLC initiative is the first of these principles. Long term commitment to a sustained plan for relevant SLC professional learning opportunities will guarantee proper training, skills, and knowledge for those working within the SLC school. The final principle defined within this article is the establishment of a foundation for professional learning communities. The absence of any one of these principles can seriously affect the success of a SLC school.
    ________________________________________________________________________

    Introduction

    Implementing smaller learning communities in large schools can be argued as the best way to advance student achievement and improve teacher professional learning. Research has been rapidly accumulating that, as far as high schools is concerned size does matter-and smaller is better (Daniels, Bizar, and Zemelman 2001). Student achievement in small schools is superior to that in large schools (Bates 1993; Eberts, Kehoe, and Stone 1982; Eicherstein 1994; Fowler and Walberg 1991; Kershaw and Blank 1993; Miller, Ellsworth, and Howell 1986; Robinson-Lewis 1991; Walberg 1992) (as cited in Cotton, 1996). Most would agree that SLC’s alone will not solve all academic gaps. Benefits such as improved collegiality and collaboration among teachers combined with improved personalized student-teacher relationships would seem to be sufficient factors to convince educators to embrace the SLC model. Limited research supports the superiority of large schools over small schools. Educators continue to struggle with successful implementation and sustainability of the small school concept.

    The Purpose of this Article

    The purpose of this article is to assist schools in recognizing the importance of the preparation required during the pre-implementation phase of the SLC initiative. To insure the successful initiation of the SLC model, schools must not overlook the importance and commitment to professional learning. Schools not willing to make a commitment to pre-implementation education and preparation are likely to experience slow and inconsistent change as a result.

    Understanding the Need for a SLC

    Establishing the need for SLC’s is fundamental for creating the understanding and support required to begin. Understanding the important concepts that make SLC’s worth studying starts with the end in mind, the child. Educators and students in mega high schools are familiar with the reality that developing a supportive and nurturing atmosphere is difficult. Students in large high schools can go through their entire high school experience and potentially not have the same group of students in class more than once. Each year students adjust to a new set of teachers who have limited or no history with the student. This traditional setting decreases the potential of establishing meaningful relationships. Studies have established that students need relationships with both peers and adults as part of a healthy learning environment. Adult connections and personalization improves the school experience.

    Each student needs to know at least one adult in the school is closely concerned with his or her fate…The relationship between the student and the advocate should ensure that no youngster experiences the sense of isolation that frequently engulfs teenagers during this critical period of their lives. Having someone on his or her side can help a young person feel a part of the school community (National Association of Secondary Principals, 1996, p. 31). If high achievement for all students is the goal of reform, then personalization and a rigorous curriculum are two essential ingredients. Although some students might be able to make it though four years of high school despite the lack of any personal connections, all students require a supportive environment-some more than others. Creating that environment is essential to bringing learning to fruition. (National Association of Secondary Principals, 2004, p. 67)

    An increased emphasis on strengthening relationships with students is at the center of the SLC model. It is imperative to establish a clear understanding of what that means to teachers and staff as well as what is expected of them. Planning ongoing professional learning that will assist the faculty in understanding the changes that need to occur will be at the focal point of creating understanding and embracing relationships. Although few would argue that teachers have been historically excellent mentors, the focus on more meaningful student relationships must be implemented correctly or it could be perceived as an extra responsibility added to an already difficult profession.

    Pre-Implementation Professional Learning

    Campus teams working in the pre-implementation stage must be fully committed to a sustained plan that will provide relevant SLC professional learning. The planning of professional learning during pre-implementation is often overlooked by school administrators. When limited planning or little effort is taken to provide relevant professional learning opportunities that ensure staff members’ deep understanding of the skills needed for using the new practices a SLC model will find it difficult to succeed. Too often, unfortunately, little care is taken to provide professional learning that insures staff members’ deep understanding of content and development of skills for using new practices (Hord and Sommers 2007). Professional learning that assists the process by creating a clear understanding of the iniative and the components that will be needed to create consensus for the initiative are critical to the process from the beginning to full implementation.
    Below is a list of topics that require professional learning during pre-implementation:

    • What is a professional learning communities
    • Professional learning communities individual and team responsibilities
    • How to develop interdisciplinary lessons
    • Interdisciplinary teaching techniques
    • Use of advisory period
    • Building support for individual and student groups
    • Building capacity in the program
    • Sustained leadership
    • Team stability
    • Articulation with college/university systems
    • Building community support

    Professional Learning Community
    Working as an effective professional learning community is important to the early success of the SLC initiative. The first and most fundamental task of building a collaborative culture is to bring together those people whose responsibilities create an inherent mutual interest in exploring the critical question of PLC (DuFour, DuFour, Eaker, & Many, 2006). The challenge for administrators is overcoming the established traditional school and familiar structure that creates an environment of isolation for teachers. This isolation results in a natural disconnection from colleagues and limits opportunities to share the educational process. Department level meetings, although informative and critical to communication, are not in most cases characterized as a professional learning community. The importance of providing training that assists teachers in the process of working together as well as emphasizes the impact that professional collaboration has on both students and teachers is a powerful step. Allowing teachers to collaborate without appropriate training or understanding why they are collaborating has the potential of creating frustration due to a lack of common experience in the process of working together and the expected outcomes of such efforts. In fact, we are convinced that one of the most common mistakes school administrators make in the implementation of improvement initiatives is to focus exclusively on the “how” while being inattentive to why (Dufour, Dufour, Eaker, & Many, 2006)
    A key to implementing a PLC that embraces collaboration will require a commitment to team planning time. Allowing collaboration time is important however allowing collaboration time during the school day is a tremendous reassurance to the commitment of SLC implementation. Expecting teachers to work in professional learning communities and creating outcomes that are benefiting the process of collaborative lesson development, discussions regarding teaching strategies, and opportunities for discussing strategies to assists struggling learners is more meaningful when a time commitment from the district is recognized.

    Creating the Right Conditions

    Under the right conditions, the problems of commitment, alignment, motivation, and change largely melt away (Collins 2001). Implementation teams that understand the importance of creating the right conditions start by establishing a foundation that a change from the present system is beneficial for students. Positive factors such as opportunities for increased and improved student relationships with peers and faculty resulting in improved attendance, decreased dropout rate, and improved academic success are keys to convincing educators to embrace the necessity for SLC’s. Comprehending that the process involves a different level of collaboration than most educators are familiar with requires a paradigm shift for many teachers. Benefits such as engaging in professional conversations in relation to educational practices and resolving common instructional issues are important. In addition the by product of building professional relationships strengthens the bonds between teachers creating stronger more meaningful support groups.

    Concluding Remarks
    Finally the success of SLC’s is dependent on a sound pre-implementation plan that is systematic and focused on creating a common and clear understanding of the initaitive. The outcome and the impact on students as well as teachers is the driving force that necessitates a smooth transition from the present structure.

    References
    Cotton K. (1996, May). School size, school climate and student performance. Retrieved November 3, 2007, from The Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory website: http://www.nwrel.org
    DuFour, R., DuFour, R., Eaker, R., and Many, T. (2006). Learning by doing: A handbook for professional learning communities at work. Bloomington, IN: Solution Tree (formerly National Educational Service).
    Daniels, D., Bizar, M., and Zemelman, S. (2001). Rethinking high schools: Best practice in teaching, learning, and leadership. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
    Hord, M. and Sommers, W.A. (2007). Leading professional learning communities: Voices from research and practice. Thousand Oaks. CA: Cowin Press.
    J. Collins, (2001). Good to great: Why some companies make the leap…and others don’t. New York: Harper Business.
    National Association of Secondary School Principals (1996). Breaking ranks: Changing an American institution. Reston, VA: Author.
    National Association of Secondary School Principals. (2004). Breaking ranks II: Strategies for leading high school reform. Reston, VA: Author.

  6. National Leadership, 78 (2) 2009

    25th Year Anniversary of National FORUM Journals
    Founded in 1983
    William Allan Kritsonis’ Contribution to Education

    Arthur L. Petterway, PhD
    Principal
    Houston Independent School District
    Houston, Texas

    ABSTRACT
    This year marks the 25th Year Anniversary of the founding of National FORUM Journals by Dr. William Allan Kritsonis. The following snapshot of the career of Dr. Kritsonis is a small tribute to his contribution to education.
    __________________________________________________________________________

    Founder of National FORUM Journals

    Dr. Kritsonis is founder of NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS (since 1983). These publications represent a group of highly respected scholarly academic periodicals. Over 4,000 writers have been published in these academic, scholarly, refereed, peer-reviewed journals.

    Dr. Kritsonis Lectures at the University of Oxford, Oxford, England

    In 2005, Dr. Kritsonis was an Invited Visiting Lecturer at the Oxford Round Table at Oriel College in the University of Oxford, Oxford, England. His lecture was entitled the Ways of Knowing Through the Realms of Meaning.

    Dr. Kritsonis Recognized as Distinguished Alumnus

    In 2004, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and
    Professional Studies. Dr. Kritsonis was nominated by alumni, former students, friends,
    faculty, and staff. Final selection was made by the Alumni Association Board of Directors.
    Recipients are CWU graduates of 20 years or more and are recognized for achievement in their professional field and have made a positive contribution to society. For

    the second consecutive year, U.S. News and World Report placed Central Washington
    University among the top elite public institutions in the west. CWU was 12th on the list in the 2006 On-Line Education of “America’s Best Colleges.”

    Educational Background

    Dr. William Allan Kritsonis earned his BA in 1969 from Central Washington University, Ellensburg, Washington. In 1971, he earned his M.Ed. from Seattle Pacific University. In 1976, he earned his PhD from the University of Iowa. In 1981, he was a Visiting Scholar at Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, and in 1987 was a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California.

    Professional Experience

    Dr. Kritsonis began his career as a teacher. He has served education as a principal, superintendent of schools, director of student teaching and field experiences, invited guest professor, author, consultant, editor-in-chief, and publisher. Dr. Kritsonis has earned tenure as a professor at the highest academic rank at two major universities.

    Books – Articles – Lectures – Workshops

    Dr. Kritsonis lectures and conducts seminars and workshops on a variety of topics. He is author of more than 500 articles in professional journals and several books. His popular book SCHOOL DISCIPLINE: The Art of Survival is scheduled for its fourth edition. He is the author of the textbook William Kritsonis, PhD on Schooling that is used by many professors at colleges and universities throughout the nation and abroad.
    In 2007, Dr. Kritsonis’ version of the book of Ways of Knowing Through the Realms of Meaning (858 pages) was published in the United States of America in cooperation with partial financial support of Visiting Lecturers, Oxford Round Table (2005). The book is the product of a collaborative twenty-four year effort started in 1978 with the late Dr. Philip H. Phenix. Dr. Kritsonis was in continuous communication with Dr. Phenix until his death in 2002.
    In 2007, Dr. Kritsonis was the lead author of the textbook Practical Applications of Educational Research and Basic Statistics. The text provides practical content knowledge in research for graduate students at the doctoral and master’s levels.
    In 2008, Dr. Kritsonis’ book Non-Renewal of Public School Personnel Contracts: Selected Supreme and District Court Decisions in Accordance with the Due Process of Law was published by The Edwin Mellen Press, Lewiston, New York.
    Dr. Kritsonis’ seminar and workshop on Writing for Professional Publication has
    been very popular with both professors and practitioners. Persons in attendance generate an
    article to be published in a refereed journal at the national or international levels. Dr. Kritsonis has traveled and lectured throughout the United States and world-wide. Some recent international tours include Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania, Turkey, Italy, Greece,

    Monte Carlo, England, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Poland,
    Germany, and many more.

    Founder of National FORUM Journals – Over 4,000 Professors Published

    Dr. Kritsonis is founder of NATIONAL FORUM JOURNALS (since 1983). These publications represent a group of highly respected scholarly academic periodicals. Over 4,000 writers have been published in these refereed, peer-reviewed periodicals. In 1983, he founded the National FORUM of Educational Administration and Supervision – now acclaimed by many as the United States’ leading recognized scholarly academic refereed journal in educational administration, leadership, and supervision.
    In 1987, Dr. Kritsonis founded the National FORUM of Applied Educational Research Journal whose aim is to conjoin the efforts of applied educational researchers world-wide with those of practitioners in education. He founded the National FORUM of Teacher Education Journal, National FORUM of Special Education Journal, National FORUM of Multicultural Issues Journal, International Journal of Scholarly Academic Intellectual Diversity, International Journal of Management, Business, and Administration, and the DOCTORAL FORUM – National Journal for Publishing and Mentoring Doctoral Student Research. The DOCTORAL FORUM is the only refereed journal in America committed to publishing doctoral students while they are enrolled in course work in their doctoral programs. In 1997, he established the Online Journal Division of National FORUM Journals that publishes academic scholarly refereed articles daily on the website: http://www.nationalforum.com. Over 600 professors have published online. In January 2007, Dr. Kritsonis established the National Journal: Focus On Colleges, Universities, and Schools.

    Professorial Roles

    Dr. Kritsonis has served in professorial roles at Central Washington University, Washington; Salisbury State University, Maryland; Northwestern State University, Louisiana; McNeese State University, Louisiana; and Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge in the Department of Administrative and Foundational Services.
    In 2006, Dr. Kritsonis published two articles in the Two-Volume Set of the Encyclopedia of Educational Leadership and Administration published by SAGE Publications, Thousand Oaks, California. He is a National Reviewer for the Journal of Research on Leadership, University Council for Educational Administration (UCEA).
    In 2007, Dr. Kritsonis was invited to write a history and philosophy of education for the ABC-CLIO Encyclopedia of World History.
    Currently, Dr. Kritsonis is Professor of Educational Leadership at Prairie View A&M University – Member of the Texas A&M University System. He teaches in the newly established PhD Program in Educational Leadership. Dr. Kritsonis taught the Inaugural class session in the doctoral program at the start of the fall 2004 academic year. In October 2006, Dr. Kritsonis chaired the first doctoral student to earn a PhD in Educational Leadership at Prairie View A&M University. He lives in Houston, Texas.

  7. Dr. William Allan Kritsonis
    Professor
    PhD Program in Educational Leadership
    PVAMU

    December 13, 2008

    Please see below a list of my doctoral advisees. One list provides the names of my advisees that have successfully defended their dissertations and will graduate in December 2008. The other list provides the names of my advisees that have successfully presented and defended their dissertation proposals during the fall 2008.

    Fall 2008 Semester – Total 4
    Dr. Kritsonis – Successful Dissertation Defenses

    Clarence Johnson – Successful Dissertation Defense, September 17, 2008
    Grace Thomas Nickerson – Successful Dissertation Defense, September 17, 2008
    Frances Worthey – Successful Dissertation Defense, October 2, 2008
    Nasrin Nazemzadeh – Successful Dissertation Defense, November 3, 2008

    Fall 2008 Semester – Total 8
    Dr. Kritsonis – Successful Proposal Defenses (Total 8)

    Janetta Gilliam – Successful Proposal Defense, September 8, 2008
    Michelle Cloud – Successful Proposal Defense, September 9, 2008
    Monica G. Williams – Successful Proposal Defense, September 26, 2008
    Jennifer Butcher – Successful Proposal Defense, October 15, 2008
    Steven Norfleet – Successful Proposal Defense, October 15, 2008
    Rebecca Duong – Successful Proposal Defense, November 19, 2008
    Debbie Watkins – Successful Proposal Defense, November 25, 2008
    Donald R. Brown, Jr. – Successful Proposal Defense, December 4, 2008

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  9. SOURCE: The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Daily News, San Jose Mercury News, New York Post, The Washington Post, Chicago Sun-Times, Denver Post, Seattle Times

    ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
    I acknowledge and thank my doctoral teacher and dissertation chair, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis for his total support. Dr. William Allan Kritsonis gave me hope that I could publish as a student and after I earned my degree. He made all doctoral assignments meaningful and allowed me to extend my research. I truly respect the unconditional love that he has for me and the success of my career. Dr. Kritsonis has kept in contact with me after my graduation from the doctoral program. He has continued to seek ways that would expand my writings and desire to publish my ideas about improving education of America’s students. I am truly grateful that he is my mentor.

  10. MENTORED RESEARCH - Dr. Kritsonis
    Mentoring and Teaching Doctoral Students and Colleagues
    To Write for Professional Publication in National Refereed Journals

    2010 (15 Pubs)

    Kuklina, S. S., Butler, N. L. & Kritsonis, W. A. (2010).Uncomfortable Topics
    for Russian Students to Discuss during English Classes. Perfection of
    Foreign Language Teaching at Universities and Schools, 14.
    Vyatka State University of Humanities, Kirov, Russia

    Butler, N.L., Pirog, R., Elcome,C. & Kritsonis,W.A. (2010). Are Some Topics Uncomfortable
    for Polish Secondary School Learners to Discuss During English Classes? Perfection of
    Foreign Language Teaching at Universities and Schools, 14.
    Vyatka State University of Humanities, Kirov, Russia

    Johnson, P. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Greener Schools, Greater Learning, and the LEED Value.
    DOCTORAL FORUM: National Journal for Publishing and Mentoring Doctoral Student Research, Volume 7, Number 1, 2010.
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED511748)

    Miller, Q. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Implementation of the Ways of Knowing through the
    Realms of Meaning as a Conceptual Framework in Professional Learning Communities
    As They Impact Strategic Planning in Education. National FORUM of Applied of
    Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2) (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED507197)

    Stevenson, R.D. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Utilizing the Six Realms of Meaning in Improving
    Campus Standardized Test Scores through Team Teaching and Strategic Planning.
    National FORUM of Applied Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED507048)

    Thompson, C. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Implementing the Ways of Knowing through the
    Realms of Meaning for Strategic Planning in K-12. National FORUM of Applied
    Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED506754)

    Ishaq, K. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) School Leadership Makes a Difference: A Sociological
    Perspective of Effective Strategic Planning and Integrating the Realms of Meaning
    Into School Improvement. National FORUM of Applied Educational Research
    Journal, 23 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED506959)

    Thompson, B. A. & Kritsonis, W. (2010) Making National, State, District, and Local Plans
    Work Using the Six Realms of meaning as it Relates to Strategic Planning in Educational
    Leadership. National FORUM of Applied Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED506733)

    Lewis, C. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Educational Leaders Incorporating Ways of Knowing
    through the Realms of Meaning to Create Successful Strategic Plans for Public Schools.
    National FORUM of Teacher Education Journal, 23 (1&2)

    Doctor, T.L. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Postmodernism and Ways of Knowing through the
    Realms of Meaning: New Answers to Lingering Problems. National FORUM of
    Applied Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)

    Palmer, D. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Strategic Planning in Schools: A View Through the Lends
    Of the Six Ways of Knowing through the Realms of Meaning. National FORUM of
    Applied Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)

    Miller-Williams, S. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) A Systems Approach to Comprehensive School
    Reform: Using the Realms of Meaning and the Baldridge Model as a Systems
    Framework. National FORUM of Applied Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED506957)

    Gardiner, S.A., & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) The Virtues of Postmodernism Electrified with the
    Use of Six Realms of Meaning in Strategic Planning. National FORUM of Applied
    Educational Research Journal, 23 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED507070)

    Diggs, D. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Strategic Excellence Thorugh the Empowerment of
    Postmodernism and the Realms of Meaning. National FORUM of Applied Educational
    Research Journal, 23 (1&2)

    Blackbourn, J. M. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) The Question Every Teacher Educator Must Ask.
    National FORUM of Teacher Education Journal, 20 (1&2)

    Doctor, T.L. & Kritsonis, W.A. (2010) Postmodernism and Ways of Knowing through the
    Realms of Meaning: New Answers to Lingering Problems. National FORUM of
    Teacher Education Journal, 20 (1&2)
    (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No.ED506757)

  11. William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
    Dissertation Chair for 23 PhD Graduates
    PhD Program in Educational Leadership PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System

    (2006-2012)

    Teresa Ann Hughes ~ December 2006
    Roselia Alaniz Salinas ~ October 2007
    Yolanda E. Smith ~ February 2008
    Clarence Johnson ~ September 2008
    Frances Craig Worthey ~ October 2008
    Nasrin Nazemzadeh ~ November 2008
    Grace Thomas Nickerson ~ December 2008
    Rhodena Townsell ~ January 2009
    Robert Marcel Branch ~ March 2009
    Jennifer T. Butcher ~ March 2009
    Michelle Annette Cloud ~ March 2009
    Janetta Carolyn Gilliam ~ March 2009
    Eunetra Ellison Simpson ~ March 2009
    Rebecca Hoa Duong ~ May 2009
    Donald Ray Brown, Jr. ~ July 2009
    Debra Denise Watkins ~ July 2009
    Monica Georgette Williams ~ July 2009
    Desiree Adair Skinner ~ March 2010
    Steven Norfleet ~ April 2010
    Alex Elias Torrez ~ April 2011
    Mary Ann Springs ~ July 2011
    Sheri L. Miller-Williams ~ September 2011
    Simone Alicia Gardiner ~ March 2012

  12. In 2004, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis was recognized as the Central Washington University Alumni Association Distinguished Alumnus for the College of Education and Professional Studies. Dr. Kritsonis was nominated by alumni, former students, friends, faculty, and staff. Final selection was made by the Alumni Association Board of Directors. Recipients are CWU graduates of 20 years or more and are recognized for achievement in their professional field and have made a positive contribution to society. For the second consecutive year, U.S. News and World Report placed Central Washington University among the top elite public institutions in the west. CWU was 12th on the list in the 2006 On-Line Education of “America’s Best Colleges.”

  13. The Region 6 Texas National Association for Multicultural Education honors Dr. William Allan Kritsonis as a Professor, Scholar, and Pioneer Publisher for Distinguished Service to Multicultural Research Publishing. The ceremony was held on the campus of Texas A&M University, College Station on April 28th 2012.

  14. SOURCE: The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Daily News, San Jose Mercury News, New York Post, The Washington Post, Chicago Sun-Times, Denver Post, Seattle Times

    ACKNOWLEDGMENT by Clarence Johnson, PhD
    Author of the book: ROLL CALL: 2012

    I acknowledge and thank my doctoral teacher and dissertation chair, Dr. William Allan Kritsonis for his total support. Dr. William Allan Kritsonis gave me hope that I could publish as a student and after I earned my degree. He made all doctoral assignments meaningful and allowed me to extend my research. I truly respect the unconditional love that he has for me and the success of my career. Dr. Kritsonis has kept in contact with me after my graduation from the doctoral program. He has continued to seek ways that would expand my writings and desire to publish my ideas about improving education of America’s students. I am truly grateful that he is my mentor.

  15. Dr. Kritsonis – 58 Total Dissertations 2004-2013

    William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
    Dissertation Chair for 24 PhD Graduates
    PhD Program in Educational Leadership
    PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System

    (2004-2013)

    Teresa Ann Hughes ~ December 2006
    Roselia Alaniz Salinas ~ October 2007
    Yolanda E. Smith ~ February 2008
    Clarence Johnson ~ September 2008
    Frances Craig Worthey ~ October 2008
    Nasrin Nazemzadeh ~ November 2008
    Grace Thomas Nickerson ~ December 2008
    Rhodena Townsell ~ January 2009
    Robert Marcel Branch ~ March 2009
    Jennifer T. Butcher ~ March 2009
    Michelle Annette Cloud ~ March 2009
    Janetta Carolyn Gilliam ~ March 2009
    Eunetra Ellison Simpson ~ March 2009
    Rebecca Hoa Duong ~ May 2009
    Donald Ray Brown, Jr. ~ July 2009
    Debra Denise Watkins ~ July 2009
    Monica Georgette Williams ~ July 2009
    Desiree Adair Skinner ~ March 2010
    Steven Norfleet ~ April 2010
    Alex Elias Torrez ~ April 2011
    Mary Ann Springs ~ July 2011
    Sheri L. Miller-Williams ~ September 2011
    Simone Alicia Gardiner ~ March 2012

    Invited Dissertation Chair
    Norman L. Butler ~ October 18, 2005
    Institute for Educational Research, Republic of Poland – Cracow

    Dr. Kritsonis
    Doctoral Dissertation Committee Member for 22 PhD Graduates
    PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System – 2004-2013

    Cheantel Adams
    Gary Bates
    Cynthia Lawry-Berkins
    James Andrew Daily
    Yul Dione Everline
    Sorie Gassama
    Bennie Lee Graves
    Doris Morgan-Bloom Higginbottom
    H. P. Hyder, III
    Karen Dupree Jacobs
    Priscilla Dawn Johnson
    Cheng-Chieh Lai
    James D. Laub
    Queinnise Miller
    Gail Cyrus-Parsons
    Margaret Curette Patton
    Arthur L. Petterway
    Barbara Ann Thompson
    Samuel Todd Stephens
    Porchaneeé A. White
    La’Shonte Williams-Iwundu
    Melody Ann Wilson

    Dr. Kritsonis
    Outside Doctoral Dissertation Committee Member for 10 PhD Graduates
    PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System – 2004-2013

    Samuel C. Arungwa – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Scott Howard Belshaw – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PAMUU
    Ayodeji Daramola – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Jaya Bolestridge Davis – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Vivian J. Dorsett – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Erin M. Espinoza – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    B. Dean Lanham – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Frank Anthony Rodriguez – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Jennifer Renee Tromley – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU
    Tonya Y. Willingham – College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology/PVAMU

    Dr. Kritsonis
    Off-Campus Doctoral Dissertation Committees for 3 Doctoral Graduates 2004-2013
    Rhonda L. Johnson – Sam Houston State University/College of Education
    Bipin Sharma – Sam Houston State University of Education

  16. A Brief Statement of My Leadership Philosophy (June 20, 2013)

    William Allan Kritsonis, PhD
    Professor
    PhD Program in Educational Leadership
    PVAMU/Member of the Texas A&M University System

    ABSTRACT

    The focus of this brief statement is to provide an example of developing a philosophy of leadership. I discusses my beliefs of leading with integrity, the importance of collaborating, the attitude of servant leadership, the significance of effective communication, how to empower others, the impact of passion being contagious throughout an organization, and keys to a life well lived.

    “Do something wonderful, people may imitate it.”
    -Albert Schweitzer (1875 – 1965)

    Purpose

    The purpose of this statement is to briefly discuss my personal philosophy of leadership. My philosophy of leadership emphasizes the importance of integrity, collaborating, servant leadership, communicating, empowering others, and the importance of passion. Leaders not only lead an organization, they lead people. Organizations will struggle unless the individuals within the organization feel a dedication of responsibility and ownership. Individuals must see a leader of integrity, who is self aware and appreciates the importance of collaboration and communication. I have developed belief statements that reflect my personal leadership philosophy.

    Number One: I believe in leading with integrity.

    Thomas Jefferson said, “Whenever you do a thing, act as if the world were watching. Integrity is an integral part of effective leadership.” All stakeholders should trust and believe that their leader will make decisions in the best interest of the community. People should know that the leader ‘means what they say and says what they mean’ and can be counted on to deliver. Integrity builds trust, a must for a successful leader. Displaying integrity develops credibility, yielding a solid reputation for the leader.

    Number Two: I believe in collaborating.

    Vince Lombardi once said, “Individual commitment to a group effort – that is what makes a team work, a company work, a society work, a civilization work.” One guiding vision drives the mission, goals, and objectives of an organization. Working together, the vision will be achieved. A leader’s primary responsibility is to collaboratively work with individuals, listen to them and learn from them. A collaborating leader has high self-esteem and encourages ideas from others and giving credit where credit is due.

    Number Three: I believe in servant leadership.

    The idea of servant leadership is to cultivate those within the organization by building trust and improving teamwork through collaboration and personal involvement. Servant leaders make decisions by developing a sense of community and maintaining a commitment to the growth of individuals. Caring for people, encouraging them, and valuing their opinions contribute to organizational goals being realized. According to John Maxwell, “People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

    Number Four: I believe in effective communicating.

    Effective communication skills are essential to the effective leader. Communication requires transforming an idea from one brain to another. Effective communication requires articulation of ideas and active listening. Mac Anderson, founder of Successories, says “The great leader truly understands that effective communication is the key that unlocks the door to trust.” Trust is essential when developing working relationships.

    Number Five: I believe in empowering others.

    Theodore Roosevelt best described the concept of empowerment as follows: “The best executive is one who has sense enough to pick good people to do what he wants done, and self-restraint enough to keep from meddling with them while they do it.” Developing individuals through empowerment increases the productivity of the organization. A leader must trust the individuals with the creativity and intellect to carry out the assigned tasks. An effective leader should recognize the abilities and aptitudes of the individuals within the teams and assign tasks accordingly. Through empowerment, individuals grow both professionally and personally, which is critical for carrying out the vision and sustaining the efforts over time.

    Number Six: I believe in passion.

    Passion, like a smile, is contagious. Leaders articulate visions, goals, and strategies. Leaders also influence the enthusiasm of those under their charge. A leader must exude passion for the pursuit of excellence. Zig Ziglar says, “Go as far as you can go. When you get there, you can always see farther.”

    “You get the best efforts from others not be lighting a fire beneath them,
    but by building a fire within”.
    -Ben Nelson

    Number Seven: The Keys to a Life Well Lived

    Taking care of those you love and letting them know they are loved; holding firm to a higher power, to your religious faith, no matter how high you rise or low you fall. This involves determination, self-discipline, and active attention to developing and refining a conscience to whose promptings you can respond. You must honor your calling or profession by trying to do within it honorable work, that takes hard effort, and a willingness to master the ethics of your field, and above all enjoying life. This can be challenging in America, where sometimes people are rather grim in their determination to get and to have. “Enjoy life, it’s ungrateful not to,” said Ronald Reagan

    Source: Noonan, P. (2008, June 21). A life’s lesson. The Wall Street Journal, p. A9.

    References

    Anderson, M. (2005). The essence of leadership. Naperville, IL: Simple Truths.

    Anderson, M. (2007). You can’t send a duck to eagle school: And other simple truths of
    leadership. Naperville, IL: Simple Truths.

    Anderson, M., & Feltenstein, T. (2007). Change is good…you go first: 21 ways to inspire
    change. Naperville, IL: Simple Truths.

    Anderson, P. (2007). Great quotes from great leaders. Naperville, IL: Simple Truths.

    Noonan, P. (2008, June 21). A life’s lesson. The Wall Street Journal, p. A9.

  17. Recently, Dr. Kritsonis was asked to serve on the United Providence National Advisory Board in Providence, Rhode Island. United Providence is a first-of-its-kind non-profit organization that will lead school transformation efforts through a labor-management collaborative model between the Providence Public School District and the Providence Teachers Union. This work will involve working with Arne Duncan, United States Secretary of Education, 2013-2016.

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